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July 28, 2015 | Posted by | No Comments

Shopping by Color: Violet

Continuing a series of posts on the topic of shopping for art by color.

via thestatementbox.com 2014

These days, I find many shops and on-line retailers choose to display their merchandise by color. Whether it’s clothing on a rack or home accessories shown in a catalog, it seems helpful to shop with a specific color in mind. Harcum visual merchandising says, “Color is the biggest motivation for shopping. People buy color before they buy size, fit or price.”

Traditionally, shopping for art doesn’t happen this way since we’ve long been advised not to ‘match the art to the curtains.’ Therefore, this will be blasphemy to purists – but let’s consider shopping for art by color for just a moment. Think of it like accessorizing an outfit. Often we have a color scheme at home, or we know what color is dominant in a room, so shopping for art in a complimentary or contrasting color creates a strong argument from a design perspective.

Putting color first also speaks volumes from a color psychology perspective. Let’s look at the color violet:

The Stillness of Color by Jon Glaser $850

This color relates to the imagination and spirituality. It stimulates the imagination and inspires high ideals. It is an introspective color, allowing us to get in touch with our deeper thoughts.

The difference between violet and purple is that violet appears in the visible light spectrum, or rainbow, whereas purple is simply a mix of red and blue. Violet has the highest vibration in the visible spectrum.

“Deep Water – Evening Sun” by Lauren Adams $1,830

While the violet is not quite as intense as purple, its essence is similar. Generally the names are interchangeable and the meaning of the colors is similar. Both contain the energy and strength of red with the spirituality and integrity of blue. This is the union of body and soul creating a balance between our physical and our spiritual energies.

Purple or violet assists those who seek the meaning of life and spiritual fulfillment – it expands our awareness, connecting us to a higher consciousness. For this reason it is associated with transformation of the soul and the philosophers of the world are often attracted to it.

Purple Zebra by Frank DeSantis $530

In the meaning of colors, purple and violet represent the future, the imagination and dreams, while spiritually calming the emotions. They inspire and enhance psychic ability and spiritual enlightenment, while, at the same time, keeping us grounded.

The color violet relates to the fantasy world, and a need to escape from the practicalities of life. It is the daydreamer escaping from reality.

Rorschach by Sharis Roe DeJaynes $140

What color is your room and will violet art make the right statement? If so, click here for more art with the color violet!

July 23, 2015 | Posted by | No Comments

Shopping By Color: Blue

Continuing a series of posts on the topic of shopping for art by color.

Photo from harcumvisualmerchandising.blogspot.com

These days, I find many shops and on-line retailers choose to display their merchandise by color. Whether it’s clothing on a rack or home accessories shown in a catalog, it seems helpful to shop with a specific color in mind. Harcum visual merchandising says, “Color is the biggest motivation for shopping. People buy color before they buy size, fit or price.”

Traditionally, shopping for art doesn’t happen this way since we’ve long been advised not to ‘match the art to the curtains.’ Therefore, this will be blasphemy to purists – but let’s consider shopping for art by color for just a moment. Think of it like accessorizing an outfit. Often we have a color scheme at home, or we know what color is dominant in a room, so shopping for art in a complimentary or contrasting color creates a strong argument from a design perspective.

Putting color first also speaks volumes from a color psychology perspective. To start, let’s look at the color blue:

Peace of Mind by Susan Ulrich $175

This color is one of trust, honesty and loyalty. It is sincere, reserved and quiet, and doesn’t like to make a fuss or draw attention. It hates confrontation, and likes to do things in its own way.

Blue Nebula by Michael Filonow $240

From a color psychology perspective, blue is reliable and responsible. Blue exhibits an inner security and confidence. You can rely on it to take control and do the right thing in difficult times. It has a need for order and direction in its life, including its living and work spaces.

Dinah by tracy burke $100

This is a color that seeks peace and tranquility above everything else, promoting both physical and mental relaxation. It reduces stress, creating a sense of calmness, relaxation and order – we certainly feel a sense of calm if we lie on our backs and look into a bright blue cloudless sky. It slows the metabolism. The paler the blue the more freedom we feel.

ICON #12 by Steve Alderton $1,075

In the meaning of colors, blue relates to one-to-one communication, especially communication using the voice – speaking the truth through verbal self-expression – it is the teacher, the public speaker.

Lost at Sea, near Nantucket by Gayle Fitzpatrick $865

The color blue is idealistic, enhancing self-expression and our ability to communicate our needs and wants. It inspires higher ideals.

So, what color is your room and will blue art make the right statement? If so, click here for more art with the color blue!

July 21, 2015 | Posted by | No Comments

Shopping By Color: Green

Continuing a series of posts on the topic of shopping for art by color.

Photo found on instoredesigndisplay.wordpress.com

These days, I find many shops and on-line retailers choose to display their merchandise by color. Whether it’s clothing on a rack or home accessories shown in a catalog, it seems helpful to shop with a specific color in mind.

Traditionally, shopping for art doesn’t happen this way since we’ve long been advised not to ‘match the art to the curtains.’ Therefore, this will be blasphemy to purists – but let’s consider shopping for art by color for just a moment. Think of it like accessorizing an outfit. Often we have a color scheme at home, or we know what color is dominant in a room, so shopping for art in a complimentary or contrasting color creates a strong argument from a design perspective.

Putting color first also speaks volumes from a color psychology perspective. To start, let’s look at the color green:

Early Morning Moon by Janice Schoultz Mudd $432

This is the color of balance and harmony. From a color psychology perspective, it is the great balancer of the heart and the emotions, creating equilibrium between the head and the heart.

One – Train Graffiti by Jon Bidwell $39

From a meaning of colors perspective, green is also the color of growth, the color of spring, of renewal and rebirth. It renews and restores depleted energy. It is the sanctuary away from the stresses of modern living, restoring us back to a sense of well being. This is why there is so much of this relaxing color on the earth, and why we need to keep it that way.

Along the Front Walk by Robert LeMar $3,040

Green is an emotionally positive color, giving us the ability to love and nurture ourselves and others unconditionally. A natural peacemaker, it must avoid the tendency to become a martyr.

White Wine Party by Simon Fairless $950

It loves to observe, and therefore relates to the counselor, the good listener, the social worker. It loves to contribute to society. It is the charity worker, the good parent and the helpful neighbor.

Pomme by Cecile Hubene $990

This is a color that has a strong sense of right or wrong, inviting good judgment. It sees both sides of the equation, weighs them up, and then usually takes the moral stand in making appropriate decisions. On the negative side, it can be judgmental and over-cautious.

So, what color is your room and will green art make the right statement? If so, click here for more art with the color green!

July 16, 2015 | Posted by | No Comments

Shopping By Color: Yellow

Continuing our topic of shopping for art by color:

Photo from tophomedesignz.blogspot.com

These days, I find many shops and on-line retailers choose to display their merchandise by color. Whether it’s clothing on a rack or home accessories shown in a catalog, it seems helpful to shop with a specific color in mind.

Traditionally, shopping for art doesn’t happen this way since we’ve long been advised not to ‘match the art to the curtains.’ Therefore, this will be blasphemy to purists – but let’s consider shopping for art by color for just a moment. Think of it like accessorizing an outfit. Often we have a color scheme at home, or we know what color is dominant in a room, so shopping for art in a complimentary or contrasting color creates a strong argument from a design perspective.

Putting color first also speaks volumes from a color psychology perspective. To start, let’s look at the color yellow:

pineapple by Bee Things $47.50

Bananas print by Luzelle van der Westhuizen $105

This color relates to acquired knowledge. It is the color which resonates with the left or logic side of the brain stimulating our mental faculties and creating mental agility and perception.

The Way Things Used to Be by Niki Bradley $40

Being the lightest hue of the spectrum, the color psychology of yellow is uplifting and illuminating, offering hope, happiness, cheerfulness and fun.

Trevor by Norman Lerner $990

Within the meaning of colors, yellow is the great communicator and loves to talk. Yellow is the color of the networker and the journalist, all working and communicating on a mental level. Yellow is the scientist, constantly analyzing, looking at both sides before making a decision; methodical and decisive. Yellow is the entertainer, the comic, the clown.

Yellow by Luis Medina $375

Yellow helps with decision making as it relates to clarity of thought and ideas, although it can often be impulsive. Yellow helps us focus, study and recall information, useful during exam time.

Yellow is non-emotional, coming from the head rather than the heart. Yellow depends on itself, preferring to not get emotionally involved.

Rock Canyon by Liz Zorn $268

Yellow is related to the ego and our sense of self worth, to how we feel about ourselves and how we are perceived by others.

So, what color is your room and will yellow art make the right statement? If so, click here for more art with the color yellow!

July 14, 2015 | Posted by | No Comments

Shopping By Color: Orange

Second in a series of posts on the topic of shopping for art by color:

Photo found on Pinterest

As I mentioned in last week’s post, I find many shops and on-line retailers choose to display their merchandise by color. Whether it’s clothing on a rack or home accessories shown in a catalog, it seems helpful to shop with a specific color in mind.

Traditionally, shopping for art doesn’t happen this way since we’ve long been advised not to ‘match the art to the curtains.’ Therefore, this will be blasphemy to purists – but let’s consider shopping for art by color for just a moment. Think of it like accessorizing an outfit. Often we have a color scheme at home, or we know what color is dominant in a room, so shopping for art in a complimentary or contrasting color creates a strong argument from a design perspective.

Double Mandarins by Bobbi Heath $210

Putting color first also speaks volumes from a color psychology perspective. To continue our conversation, let’s look at the color orange:

Orange relates to ‘gut reaction’ or our gut instincts, as opposed to the physical reaction of red or the mental reaction of yellow.

Abstract Orange by Anyes Galleani $1,595

Orange offers emotional strength in difficult times. It helps us to bounce back from disappointments and despair, assisting in recovery from grief.

Tangerine by Pietro Canali $1,300

The color orange relates to social communication, stimulating two way conversations. A warm and inviting color, it is both physically and mentally stimulating, so it gets people thinking and talking.

Paintings on Paper Number 18 by stephen cimini $622

Orange is also stimulating to the appetite. If you love having people around the kitchen table, orange will keep them talking and eating for a long time. Many restaurants use pastel versions of orange, such as apricot or peach or deeper versions such as terracotta, for their décor as they are more subtle than red, yet still increase the appetite and promote conversation and social interaction, which in turn encourages patrons to have a good time and to eat and drink more.

Shinjuku by Eleanor Harwood

So, what color is your room and will orange art make the right statement? If so, click here for more art with the color orange!

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